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20130813
20130813
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
you are 21, you are from mississippi, going through the police academy. it is 1989 and you are now working in los angeles. after being a patrol officer for just a few months, you are placed on gang detail. you have arrested a youth. instead of taking him to jail, you taken to his mother. the mother says, can you make him more afraid of you that of the gang members? the academy does not prepare you for that. i take that experience and i realized in the gang environment, most of these youths are coming from single- family households. in the area where the gang violence is most prevalent, great citizens of the community, 99% of those citizens are afraid. as a prosecutor, i take this experience and figure out how i want to enforce gang violence, especially in san francisco. i break it down into three categories. you have the individual who is not fully immersed in the gang lifestyle. he is just an associate comment just hanging out. -- associates, just hanging out. for that individual, we try to work with community-based programs. i've met with dcyf, the african- american steering comm
and new york, but also states like mississippi, south carolina, west virginia, wyoming, iowa, all of which use this mid deem charge rather than felony. and what we find in these 13 other states is that there are higher rates of drug treatment participation, lower rates of drug use, and even slightly lower rates of violent and property crime. so again, we can prove we can have safer communities. and then of course there are the unintended consequences of a felony conviction. consequences that really can cause great damage to a young life for many decades out. the very three things that can keep someone successfully in his or her recovery, access to housing, education and employment are put farther out of reach because of a felony conviction, especially in a down economy, someone with a felony has great difficulty even accessing 5 a job that pays minimum wage. putting these felony convictions to a whole population of young people, we really perpetuate a chronic underclass which benefits none of us. and then of course there's the inequity in the criminal justice system. even though we can sho
a burn in mississippi. people are not being hung in mississippi any more. there's racism there, no doubt. there's racism in boston. when you went through those periods, i went through them in boston, i was amazed how much the white community were really outraged in boston. but let's keep in mind the tenor of the times you're born in. these kids today are not born at a time when there's racial tension. >> still, the leader of the senate. >> i understand that. >> president obama noted in his remarks when he made in the white house press briefing room at the end of the trayvon martin trial, or the george zimmerman trial, about the killing of trayvon martin, he said his daughters, sasha and malia don't talk this way. we learn from previous experiences. what i think is concerning is how exacerbated the administration makes these. partly because we pay attention to what they say, we're looking for any signal, we want the president to bring us together and it actually hasn't happened. maybe that's the fault of those who would oppose him on his policies. somehow i don't -- i actually can't get m
to challenge them. quick examples, in 2001, a small town in mississippi tried to for theocal elections first time ever county leaders attempted to resurrect voting procedures nearly identical but hearty -- nearly identical to those that have arden found to violate the voting rights act. legislator texas quietly amended the eligibility -- eligibility requirements. noted they would disqualify and number of incumbent hispanic supervisors and there was a significant disparity in ownership rates between whites and minorities. future cases like these will end very differently. citizens will be disenfranchised. victimized by the law instead of served by it. that progress, historical progress toward a more perfect union will go backwards instead of forward. what can we do and why am i talking to you, the members of the house of delegates about what can happen and what you can do? i think we need an approach that moves on multiple fronts at once. stepped-up enforcement by the department of justice, and new legislation from congress and grassroots actions by citizens of lawyers across the country. fir
of the eight states that are highest were louisiana, mississippi, states like this. one of the things that's interesting to me is the states that ended up lowest on the list were not the most liberal or coals mott policy tan. they were the whitest states, like north dakota, idaho, and northern new england. so there's this just lingering craziness that still exist it is out there. obviously there's a tactics to the take on votes rights, but we also have to consider the possibility and i think the president is sort of considering this that we're a bit more racist than we like to think. >> we're here in new york city where the stop-and-frisk, the fact that the judge sheindlin has rule that stop and frisk is unconstitutional, hats given rights to a huge debate about whether people of color truly are treated equally. you have mayor bloomberg say this policy is good for minority communities and you have a judge who says it's unstill independents and african-americans have been saying for decades that profiling is wrong and feels wrong, and it reduces -- there's been this unwillingness to tackle
. , james is ini ocean springs, and he supports same-sex marriage. >> yes, and mississippi, of .ourse, does not recognize i am originally from louisiana, and it is not recognized. but just like all other civil progress, the south as far behind. it will take some time to reach it, but we will eventually get there. lived inng have you mississippi? >> just over a year. of the time i spent in louisiana and i lived in baileys, central america, for the last five years before e,ming to mississippi -- beliz central america, for the last five years before coming to mississippi. >> mark, go ahead with your comment. thismain point to all of is, we live in a great country and everybody has the right to be wrong. everybody has the right to be right. what we have here is a battle over semantics, i think. can be think the union called marriage because marriage is a sacrament. it is sacred. it is holy. , a homosexual marriage, is sodomy. that is not holy. that is an unholy union. if you want to go ahead and have the government take care of all of your finances and everything after you die, then call it som
feel like they can go ahead. so texas first. maybe alabama. maybe mississippi. maybe north carolina after today. sometimes you use the bully pulpit. sometimes you have the authority to weigh in and stop something directly. sometimes when you lose that authority, as justice department did during the, with the voting rights act case. sometimes when you lose that authority, you instead decide you're going to sue. what is the range of options available to you? and how do you use it? how do you still try to make progress when some avenues toward the progress you want to make are blocked? on the issue of drugs and criminal justice, the obama administration made it a priority to try to reduce the huge disparity in sentencing for crack cocaine versus powder cocaine. i mean, if cocaine is the problem, why be so much more lenient for one variety of cocaine and so much more strict for the other? o on that issue, the administration found a lot of allies in congress. the build to reduce those sentencing disparities between crack cocaine and powder cocaine, that bill passed by a voice vote in the
? your answer, just two. iowa and mississippi. hat tip to our friend jonathan martin at the "new york times" for that factoid. congratulations, by the way. today's winner jamie. trivia suggestion to "the daily rundown"@msnbc.com. we'll be right back. announcer ] made just a little sweeter... because all these whole grains aren't healthy unless you actually eat them ♪ multigrain cheerios. also available in delicious peanut butter. healthy never tasted so sweet. >>> we're back now with more of the daily rundown. you heard it from mike and brad the fight over health care will be driving a lot of the conversation as soon as congress gets back to work. we learned today the obama administration is delaying another portion of the president's signature health care reform act a piece of the law that limits out of pocket costs meaning how much of their own money individuals could be forced to spend on health care another grace period before that part of the obama care would go into effect. joining us is our gaggle. karen and ann and kristen is with us. ann, ask you first. the delay comes afte
voting right cases for department.justice in 1963 in mississippi, john stepped between angry protesters and armed police to prevent a potential massacre after the murder of medgar evers. that was the kind of lawyer and later he was. years later, he gave me a photo with an inscription from tennyson's ulysses. to strive, to seek to a find, and not to yield. our nation's greatness is not a birthright. it must be earned by every generation. i am confident that we can earn it for this time. we are at our best one we live our values, including our devotion to democracy and protection under the rule of law when we widen that circle of opportunity and extend dignity to all of our citizens. i believe strongly that that is what is called for today. there is no group that i have more confidence in being able to rise and meet that challenge than the lawyers of america and particularly, the american bar association. thank you all very much. [applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> americans for tax reform president
cases for the kennedy justice department. in 1963 in mississippi, john stepped between angry protesters and armed police to prevent a potential massacre after the murder of medgar evers. and was the kind of lawyer later he was. years later, he gave me a photo with an inscription from tennyson's ulysses. to strive, to seek to a find, and not to yield. our nation's greatness is not a birthright. it must be earned by every generation. i am confident that we can earn it for this time. we are at our best one we live -- when we live our values, including our devotion to democracy and protection under the rule of law when we widen that circle of opportunity and extend dignity to all of our citizens. i believe strongly that that is what is called for today. have is no group that i more confidence in being able to rise and meet that challenge than the lawyers of america and particularly, the american bar association. thank you all very much. [applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> denied, on c-span's encore pr
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)